Reading & Literary

Explore book clubs, author readings & more.

Do you love to talk about what you’re reading? Join a book club to share your thoughts and hear what others have to say about books that spark discussion, curiosity, and debate! Discover new “Books to Talk About” and join a community of booklovers at NVDPL. Simply read the book and join us at the meeting!

Register online for the time and location that’s most convenient for you to receive meeting instructions and information in advance of the discussion! Join us every month or just for the meetings you prefer. If you miss a meeting but still want to discuss the book, you can also join us at a different time or location. Click here to see all six Books to Talk About book clubs.

Copies of the next book will be available to pick-up from Capilano Library on or after the date of the current meeting. All books are offered on a first-come, first-served basis. Copies are also available in other formats, such as print, ebook, audiobooks, and more. Ask staff to help you find a copy!
 
This group meets in the Meeting Room at Capilano Library and online via Zoom.
 
 
Registration is optional. Everyone is welcome to drop in to any of the discussions; register online to receive handouts, reminders, etc.
 
 

20232024 Schedule for the Capilano Tuesday Evening Book Club:


Small Things Like These by Claire Keegan 
September 26 at 7:00pm 
It is 1985 in a small Irish town. During the weeks leading up to Christmas, Bill Furlong, a coal merchant and family man faces into his busiest season. Early one morning, while delivering an order to the local convent, Bill makes a discovery which forces him to confront both his past and the complicit silences of a town controlled by the church. Small Things Like These is a deeply affecting story of hope, quiet heroism, and empathy from one of our most critically lauded and iconic writers. Learn more.

We Measure the Earth with Our Bodies by Tsering Yangzom Lama
October 24 at 7:00pm 
In the wake of China's invasion of Tibet throughout the 1950s, Lhamo and her younger sister, Tenkyi, arrive at a refugee camp in Nepal. They survived the dangerous journey across the Himalayas, but their parents did not. As Lhamo - haunted by the loss of her homeland and her mother, a village oracle - tries to rebuild a life amid a shattered community, hope arrives in the form of a young man named Samphel and his uncle, who brings with him the ancient statue of the Nameless Saint-a relic known to vanish and reappear in times of need. Decades later, the sisters are separated, and Tenkyi is living with Lhamo's daughter, Dolma, in Toronto. While Tenkyi works as a cleaner and struggles with traumatic memories, Dolma vies for a place as a scholar of Tibetan Studies. But when Dolma comes across the Nameless Saint in a collector's vault, she must decide what she is willing to do for her community, even if it means risking her dreams. Learn more.

The Heart is a Lonely Hunter by Carson McCullers
November 28 at 7:00pm 
Carson McCullers’ prodigious first novel was published in 1940 to instant acclaim when she was just twenty-three. Set in a small town in the middle of the deep South, it is the story of John Singer, a lonely deaf-mute, and a disparate group of people who are drawn towards his kind, sympathetic nature. The owner of the café where Singer eats every day, a young girl desperate to grow up, an angry drunkard, a frustrated black doctor: each pours their heart out to Singer, their silent confidant, and he in turn changes their disenchanted lives in ways they could never imagine. Learn more.

Laughing with the Trickster: On Sex, Death, and Accordions by Tomson Highway
January 23 at 7:00pm 
Celebrated author and playwright Tomson Highway brings his signature irreverence to an exploration of five themes central to the human condition: language, creation, sex and gender, humour, and death. A comparative analysis of Christian, classical, and Cree mythologies reveals their contributions to Western thought, life, and culture—and how North American Indigenous mythologies provide unique, timeless solutions to our modern problems. Collected essays from the 2022 Massey Lectures. Learn more.

True Biz by Sara Nović
February 27 at 7:00pm 
"True biz? The students at the River Valley School for the Deaf just want to hook up, pass their history final, and have doctors, politicians, and their parents stop telling them what to do with their bodies. This revelatory novel plunges readers into the halls of a residential school for the deaf, where they'll meet Charlie, a rebellious transfer student who's never met another deaf person before; Austin, the school's  golden boy, whose world is rocked when his baby sister is born hearing; and February, the headmistress, who is fighting to keep her school open and her marriage intact, but might not be able to do both. As a series of crises both personal and political threaten to unravel each of them, Charlie, Austin, and February find their lives inextricable from one another—and changed forever. Learn more.

Man’s Search for Meaning by Viktor Frankl
March 26 at 7:00pm 
Hungarian psychiatrist Viktor Frankl's 1959 memoir has riveted generations of readers with its descriptions of life in Nazi death camps and its lessons for spiritual survival. Based on his own experience and the stories of his patients, Frankl argues that we cannot avoid suffering but we can choose how to cope with it, find meaning in it, and move forward with renewed purpose. At the heart of his theory, known as logotherapy, is a conviction that the primary human drive is not pleasure but the pursuit of what we find meaningful. Learn more.
 
Miss Iceland by Auđur Ava Ólafsdóttir
April 23 at 7:00pm 
Iceland in the 1960s. Hekla is a budding female novelist who was born in the remote district of Dalir. After packing her few belongings, including James Joyces's Ulysses and a Remington typewriter, she heads for Reykjavik with a manuscript buried in her bags. There, she intends to become a writer. Sharing an apartment with her childhood and queer friend Jón John, Hekla comes to learn that she will have to stand alone in a small male-dominated community that would rather see her win a pageant than be a professional artist. As the two friends find themselves increasingly on the outside, their bond shapes and strengthens them artistically in the most moving of ways. Learn more.
 
Wired for Music by Adriana Barton
May 28 at 7:00pm 
In this captivating blend of science and memoir, a Canadian health journalist and former cellist explores music as a source of health, resilience, connection, and joy. Traveling from state-of-the-art science labs to a remote village in Zimbabwe, her investigation gets to the heart of music’s profound effects on the human body and brain. Blending science and story, Wired for Music shows how our species’ age-old connection to melody and rhythm is wired inside us. Learn more.

 

 

We're moving to a new events platform!

To register for this program, please visit: https://nvdpl.events.mylibrary.digital/series?si=&sn=books+to+talk+about

 

 
Location:
Tuesday, May 28, 2024 - 7:00pm

Paws 4 Stories is a St. John Ambulance Therapy Dog Community Service that is designed to assist in helping to improve reading skills of children.

In this program, children have the opportunity to read to a friendly, certified therapy dog. Reading to a therapy dog can be motivating and especially beneficial for children who are hesitant or anxious about reading. 

Ages 6 - 12. Sessions are 20 minutes in length -  children can sign up for a maximum of 2 sessions each.

 

Registration required. Call Parkgate Library to register: 604-929-3727, ext. 8166. Registration is first-come, first-served, though priority will be given to those who have not participated before. 

Location:
Thursday, May 30, 2024 - 4:30pm to 5:30pm

Do you love to talk about what you’re reading? Join a book club to share your thoughts and hear what others have to say about books that spark discussion, curiosity, and debate! Discover new “Books to Talk About” and join a community of booklovers at NVDPL. Simply read the book and join us at the meeting!

Register online for the time and location that’s most convenient for you to receive meeting instructions and information in advance of the discussion! Join us every month or just for the meetings you prefer. If you miss a meeting but still want to discuss the book, you can also join us at a different time or location. Click here to see all six Books to Talk About book clubs.

Copies of the next book will be available to pick-up from Parkgate Library on or after the date of the current meeting. All books are offered on a first-come, first-served basis. Copies are also available in other formats, such as print, ebook, audiobooks, and more. Ask staff to help you find a copy!
 
This group meets in the Enid Dearing Meeting Room at Parkgate Library and online via Zoom. 
 
 
Registration is optional. Everyone is welcome to drop in to any of the discussions; register online to receive handouts, reminders, etc.
 
 
 

20232024 Schedule for the Parkgate Tuesday Afternoon Book Club:

 
Wired for Music by Adriana Barton
October 3 at 2:30pm 
In this captivating blend of science and memoir, a Canadian health journalist and former cellist explores music as a source of health, resilience, connection, and joy. Traveling from state-of-the-art science labs to a remote village in Zimbabwe, her investigation gets to the heart of music’s profound effects on the human body and brain. Blending science and story, Wired for Music shows how our species’ age-old connection to melody and rhythm is wired inside us. Learn more.

Small Things Like These by Claire Keegan 
November 7 at 2:30pm 
It is 1985 in a small Irish town. During the weeks leading up to Christmas, Bill Furlong, a coal merchant and family man faces into his busiest season. Early one morning, while delivering an order to the local convent, Bill makes a discovery which forces him to confront both his past and the complicit silences of a town controlled by the church. Small Things Like These is a deeply affecting story of hope, quiet heroism, and empathy from one of our most critically lauded and iconic writers. Learn more.

We Measure the Earth with Our Bodies by Tsering Yangzom Lama
December 5 at 2:30pm 
In the wake of China's invasion of Tibet throughout the 1950s, Lhamo and her younger sister, Tenkyi, arrive at a refugee camp in Nepal. They survived the dangerous journey across the Himalayas, but their parents did not. As Lhamo - haunted by the loss of her homeland and her mother, a village oracle - tries to rebuild a life amid a shattered community, hope arrives in the form of a young man named Samphel and his uncle, who brings with him the ancient statue of the Nameless Saint-a relic known to vanish and reappear in times of need. Decades later, the sisters are separated, and Tenkyi is living with Lhamo's daughter, Dolma, in Toronto. While Tenkyi works as a cleaner and struggles with traumatic memories, Dolma vies for a place as a scholar of Tibetan Studies. But when Dolma comes across the Nameless Saint in a collector's vault, she must decide what she is willing to do for her community, even if it means risking her dreams. Learn more.

The Heart is a Lonely Hunter by Carson McCullers
February 6 at 2:30pm 
Carson McCullers’ prodigious first novel was published in 1940 to instant acclaim when she was just twenty-three. Set in a small town in the middle of the deep South, it is the story of John Singer, a lonely deaf-mute, and a disparate group of people who are drawn towards his kind, sympathetic nature. The owner of the café where Singer eats every day, a young girl desperate to grow up, an angry drunkard, a frustrated black doctor: each pours their heart out to Singer, their silent confidant, and he in turn changes their disenchanted lives in ways they could never imagine. Learn more.

Laughing with the Trickster: On Sex, Death, and Accordions by Tomson Highway
March 5 at 2:30pm 
Celebrated author and playwright Tomson Highway brings his signature irreverence to an exploration of five themes central to the human condition: language, creation, sex and gender, humour, and death. A comparative analysis of Christian, classical, and Cree mythologies reveals their contributions to Western thought, life, and culture—and how North American Indigenous mythologies provide unique, timeless solutions to our modern problems. Collected essays from the 2022 Massey Lectures. Learn more.

True Biz by Sara Nović
April 2 at 2:30pm 
"True biz? The students at the River Valley School for the Deaf just want to hook up, pass their history final, and have doctors, politicians, and their parents stop telling them what to do with their bodies. This revelatory novel plunges readers into the halls of a residential school for the deaf, where they'll meet Charlie, a rebellious transfer student who's never met another deaf person before; Austin, the school's  golden boy, whose world is rocked when his baby sister is born hearing; and February, the headmistress, who is fighting to keep her school open and her marriage intact, but might not be able to do both. As a series of crises both personal and political threaten to unravel each of them, Charlie, Austin, and February find their lives inextricable from one another—and changed forever. Learn more.

Man’s Search for Meaning by Viktor Frankl
May 7 at 2:30pm 
Hungarian psychiatrist Viktor Frankl's 1959 memoir has riveted generations of readers with its descriptions of life in Nazi death camps and its lessons for spiritual survival. Based on his own experience and the stories of his patients, Frankl argues that we cannot avoid suffering but we can choose how to cope with it, find meaning in it, and move forward with renewed purpose. At the heart of his theory, known as logotherapy, is a conviction that the primary human drive is not pleasure but the pursuit of what we find meaningful. Learn more.
 
Miss Iceland by Auđur Ava Ólafsdóttir
June 4 at 2:30pm 
Iceland in the 1960s. Hekla is a budding female novelist who was born in the remote district of Dalir. After packing her few belongings, including James Joyces's Ulysses and a Remington typewriter, she heads for Reykjavik with a manuscript buried in her bags. There, she intends to become a writer. Sharing an apartment with her childhood and queer friend Jón John, Hekla comes to learn that she will have to stand alone in a small male-dominated community that would rather see her win a pageant than be a professional artist. As the two friends find themselves increasingly on the outside, their bond shapes and strengthens them artistically in the most moving of ways. Learn more.
 
 
 

We're moving to a new events platform!

To register for this program, please visit: https://nvdpl.events.mylibrary.digital/series?si=&sn=books+to+talk+about

 

 
Location:
Tuesday, June 4, 2024 - 2:30pm

Do you love to talk about what you’re reading? Join a book club to share your thoughts and hear what others have to say about books that spark discussion, curiosity, and debate! Discover new “Books to Talk About” and join a community of booklovers at NVDPL. Simply read the book and join us at the meeting!

Register online for the time and location that’s most convenient for you to receive meeting instructions and information in advance of the discussion! Join us every month or just for the meetings you prefer. If you miss a meeting but still want to discuss the book, you can also join us at a different time or location. Click here to see all six Books to Talk About book clubs.

Copies of the next book will be available to pick-up from Parkgate Library on or after the date of the current meeting. All books are offered on a first-come, first-served basis. Copies are also available in other formats, such as print, ebook, audiobooks, and more. Ask staff to help you find a copy!
 
This group meets in the Enid Dearing Meeting Room at Parkgate Library.
 
 
Registration is optional. Everyone is welcome to drop in to any of the discussions; register online to receive handouts, reminders, etc.
 
 

20232024 Schedule for the Parkgate Wednesday Evening Book Club:


True Biz by Sara Nović
October 4 at 7:00pm 
"True biz? The students at the River Valley School for the Deaf just want to hook up, pass their history final, and have doctors, politicians, and their parents stop telling them what to do with their bodies. This revelatory novel plunges readers into the halls of a residential school for the deaf, where they'll meet Charlie, a rebellious transfer student who's never met another deaf person before; Austin, the school's  golden boy, whose world is rocked when his baby sister is born hearing; and February, the headmistress, who is fighting to keep her school open and her marriage intact, but might not be able to do both. As a series of crises both personal and political threaten to unravel each of them, Charlie, Austin, and February find their lives inextricable from one another—and changed forever. Learn more.

Man’s Search for Meaning by Viktor Frankl
November 1 at 7:00pm 
Hungarian psychiatrist Viktor Frankl's 1959 memoir has riveted generations of readers with its descriptions of life in Nazi death camps and its lessons for spiritual survival. Based on his own experience and the stories of his patients, Frankl argues that we cannot avoid suffering but we can choose how to cope with it, find meaning in it, and move forward with renewed purpose. At the heart of his theory, known as logotherapy, is a conviction that the primary human drive is not pleasure but the pursuit of what we find meaningful. Learn more.
 
Miss Iceland by Auđur Ava Ólafsdóttir
December 6 at 7:00pm 
Iceland in the 1960s. Hekla is a budding female novelist who was born in the remote district of Dalir. After packing her few belongings, including James Joyces's Ulysses and a Remington typewriter, she heads for Reykjavik with a manuscript buried in her bags. There, she intends to become a writer. Sharing an apartment with her childhood and queer friend Jón John, Hekla comes to learn that she will have to stand alone in a small male-dominated community that would rather see her win a pageant than be a professional artist. As the two friends find themselves increasingly on the outside, their bond shapes and strengthens them artistically in the most moving of ways. Learn more.
 
Wired for Music by Adriana Barton
February 7 at 7:00pm 
In this captivating blend of science and memoir, a Canadian health journalist and former cellist explores music as a source of health, resilience, connection, and joy. Traveling from state-of-the-art science labs to a remote village in Zimbabwe, her investigation gets to the heart of music’s profound effects on the human body and brain. Blending science and story, Wired for Music shows how our species’ age-old connection to melody and rhythm is wired inside us. Learn more.

Small Things Like These by Claire Keegan 
March 6 at 7:00pm 
It is 1985 in a small Irish town. During the weeks leading up to Christmas, Bill Furlong, a coal merchant and family man faces into his busiest season. Early one morning, while delivering an order to the local convent, Bill makes a discovery which forces him to confront both his past and the complicit silences of a town controlled by the church. Small Things Like These is a deeply affecting story of hope, quiet heroism, and empathy from one of our most critically lauded and iconic writers. Learn more.

We Measure the Earth with Our Bodies by Tsering Yangzom Lama
April 3 at 7:00pm 
In the wake of China's invasion of Tibet throughout the 1950s, Lhamo and her younger sister, Tenkyi, arrive at a refugee camp in Nepal. They survived the dangerous journey across the Himalayas, but their parents did not. As Lhamo - haunted by the loss of her homeland and her mother, a village oracle - tries to rebuild a life amid a shattered community, hope arrives in the form of a young man named Samphel and his uncle, who brings with him the ancient statue of the Nameless Saint-a relic known to vanish and reappear in times of need. Decades later, the sisters are separated, and Tenkyi is living with Lhamo's daughter, Dolma, in Toronto. While Tenkyi works as a cleaner and struggles with traumatic memories, Dolma vies for a place as a scholar of Tibetan Studies. But when Dolma comes across the Nameless Saint in a collector's vault, she must decide what she is willing to do for her community, even if it means risking her dreams. Learn more.

The Heart is a Lonely Hunter by Carson McCullers
May 1 at 7:00pm 
Carson McCullers’ prodigious first novel was published in 1940 to instant acclaim when she was just twenty-three. Set in a small town in the middle of the deep South, it is the story of John Singer, a lonely deaf-mute, and a disparate group of people who are drawn towards his kind, sympathetic nature. The owner of the café where Singer eats every day, a young girl desperate to grow up, an angry drunkard, a frustrated black doctor: each pours their heart out to Singer, their silent confidant, and he in turn changes their disenchanted lives in ways they could never imagine. Learn more.

Laughing with the Trickster: On Sex, Death, and Accordions by Tomson Highway
June 5 at 7:00pm 
Celebrated author and playwright Tomson Highway brings his signature irreverence to an exploration of five themes central to the human condition: language, creation, sex and gender, humour, and death. A comparative analysis of Christian, classical, and Cree mythologies reveals their contributions to Western thought, life, and culture—and how North American Indigenous mythologies provide unique, timeless solutions to our modern problems. Collected essays from the 2022 Massey Lectures. Learn more.

 

We're moving to a new events platform!

To register for this program, please visit: https://nvdpl.events.mylibrary.digital/series?si=&sn=books+to+talk+about

 

 
 
Location:
Wednesday, June 5, 2024 - 7:00pm

Discuss great reads from the comfort of your couch or from faraway shores with Libby Book Club! We pick top e-books and audiobooks from the Libby app and discuss them every month on Zoom.

Register online to receive meeting instructions and information in advance of the discussion. Join us every month, or just for the meetings you prefer. Copies of these titles are available as both eBooks and audiobooks in Libby. Contact info@nvdpl.ca if you need help getting a copy.

 

2023–2024 Schedule for Libby Book Club:

 
Disoriental by Négar Djavadi (September 7 at 10:30am)
 
Half-Bads in White Regalia by Cody Caetano (October 5 at 10:30am)
 
Black Cake by Charmaine Wilkerson (November 2 at 10:30am)
 
The Dictionary of Lost Words by Pip Williams (December 7 at 10:30am)
 
The Thursday Murder Club by Richard Osman (January 4 at 10:30am)
 
The Violin Conspiracy by Brendan Slocumb (February 1 at 10:30am)
 
Astra by Cedar Bowers (March 7 at 10:30am)
 
Golden Child by Claire Adam (April 4 at 10:30am)
 
Before the Coffee Gets Cold by Toshikazu Kawaguchi (May 2 at 10:30am)
 
Fleishman is in Trouble by Taffy Brodesser-Akner (June 6 at 10:30am)

 

We're hosting this virtual program on Zoom. Register online to receive a link to join the meeting.  What you'll need to attend:  A computer with microphone (or headphones) and webcam, or your smartphone/tablet.

 

We're moving to a new events platform!

To register for this program, please visit: https://nvdpl.events.mylibrary.digital/series?si=79837&sn=

 

 

Location:
Thursday, June 6, 2024 - 10:30am to 11:30am

Not your average book club! 

In this friendly book club, we read Advance Reading Copies of soon-to-be-published books and share our reviews! We meet monthly to discuss our books with fellow bibliophiles.

Read & Review Teen Book Club is for grades 7-12.

 

No registration required. Questions? Email tag@nvdpl.ca for more information. 

 

Location:
Thursday, June 6, 2024 - 4:00pm to 5:00pm

Do you love to talk about what you’re reading? Join a book club to share your thoughts and hear what others have to say about books that spark discussion, curiosity, and debate! Discover new “Books to Talk About” and join a community of booklovers at NVDPL. Simply read the book and join us at the meeting!

Register online for the time and location that’s most convenient for you to receive meeting instructions and information in advance of the discussion! Join us every month or just for the meetings you prefer. If you miss a meeting but still want to discuss the book, you can also join us at a different time or location. Click here to see all six Books to Talk About book clubs.

Copies of the next book will be available to pick-up from Lynn Valley Library on or after the date of the current meeting. All books are offered on a first-come, first-served basis. Copies are also available in other formats, such as print, ebook, audiobooks, and more. Ask staff to help you find a copy!
 
This group meets in the Program Room at Lynn Valley Library.
 
 
Registration is optional. Everyone is welcome to drop in to any of the discussions; register online to receive handouts, reminders, etc.
 
 

20232024 Schedule for the Lynn Valley Wednesday Afternoon Book Club:

 
Miss Iceland by Auđur Ava Ólafsdóttir
October 11 at 2:30pm 
Iceland in the 1960s. Hekla is a budding female novelist who was born in the remote district of Dalir. After packing her few belongings, including James Joyces's Ulysses and a Remington typewriter, she heads for Reykjavik with a manuscript buried in her bags. There, she intends to become a writer. Sharing an apartment with her childhood and queer friend Jón John, Hekla comes to learn that she will have to stand alone in a small male-dominated community that would rather see her win a pageant than be a professional artist. As the two friends find themselves increasingly on the outside, their bond shapes and strengthens them artistically in the most moving of ways. Learn more.
 
Wired for Music by Adriana Barton
November 8 at 2:30pm 
In this captivating blend of science and memoir, a Canadian health journalist and former cellist explores music as a source of health, resilience, connection, and joy. Traveling from state-of-the-art science labs to a remote village in Zimbabwe, her investigation gets to the heart of music’s profound effects on the human body and brain. Blending science and story, Wired for Music shows how our species’ age-old connection to melody and rhythm is wired inside us. Learn more.

Small Things Like These by Claire Keegan 
January 10 at 2:30pm 
It is 1985 in a small Irish town. During the weeks leading up to Christmas, Bill Furlong, a coal merchant and family man faces into his busiest season. Early one morning, while delivering an order to the local convent, Bill makes a discovery which forces him to confront both his past and the complicit silences of a town controlled by the church. Small Things Like These is a deeply affecting story of hope, quiet heroism, and empathy from one of our most critically lauded and iconic writers. Learn more.

We Measure the Earth with Our Bodies by Tsering Yangzom Lama
February 14 at 2:30pm 
In the wake of China's invasion of Tibet throughout the 1950s, Lhamo and her younger sister, Tenkyi, arrive at a refugee camp in Nepal. They survived the dangerous journey across the Himalayas, but their parents did not. As Lhamo - haunted by the loss of her homeland and her mother, a village oracle - tries to rebuild a life amid a shattered community, hope arrives in the form of a young man named Samphel and his uncle, who brings with him the ancient statue of the Nameless Saint-a relic known to vanish and reappear in times of need. Decades later, the sisters are separated, and Tenkyi is living with Lhamo's daughter, Dolma, in Toronto. While Tenkyi works as a cleaner and struggles with traumatic memories, Dolma vies for a place as a scholar of Tibetan Studies. But when Dolma comes across the Nameless Saint in a collector's vault, she must decide what she is willing to do for her community, even if it means risking her dreams. Learn more.

The Heart is a Lonely Hunter by Carson McCullers
March 13 at 2:30pm 
Carson McCullers’ prodigious first novel was published in 1940 to instant acclaim when she was just twenty-three. Set in a small town in the middle of the deep South, it is the story of John Singer, a lonely deaf-mute, and a disparate group of people who are drawn towards his kind, sympathetic nature. The owner of the café where Singer eats every day, a young girl desperate to grow up, an angry drunkard, a frustrated black doctor: each pours their heart out to Singer, their silent confidant, and he in turn changes their disenchanted lives in ways they could never imagine. Learn more.

Laughing with the Trickster: On Sex, Death, and Accordions by Tomson Highway
April 10 at 2:30pm 
Celebrated author and playwright Tomson Highway brings his signature irreverence to an exploration of five themes central to the human condition: language, creation, sex and gender, humour, and death. A comparative analysis of Christian, classical, and Cree mythologies reveals their contributions to Western thought, life, and culture—and how North American Indigenous mythologies provide unique, timeless solutions to our modern problems. Collected essays from the 2022 Massey Lectures. Learn more.

True Biz by Sara Nović
May 8 at 2:30pm 
"True biz? The students at the River Valley School for the Deaf just want to hook up, pass their history final, and have doctors, politicians, and their parents stop telling them what to do with their bodies. This revelatory novel plunges readers into the halls of a residential school for the deaf, where they'll meet Charlie, a rebellious transfer student who's never met another deaf person before; Austin, the school's  golden boy, whose world is rocked when his baby sister is born hearing; and February, the headmistress, who is fighting to keep her school open and her marriage intact, but might not be able to do both. As a series of crises both personal and political threaten to unravel each of them, Charlie, Austin, and February find their lives inextricable from one another—and changed forever. Learn more.

Man’s Search for Meaning by Viktor Frankl
June 12 at 2:30pm 
Hungarian psychiatrist Viktor Frankl's 1959 memoir has riveted generations of readers with its descriptions of life in Nazi death camps and its lessons for spiritual survival. Based on his own experience and the stories of his patients, Frankl argues that we cannot avoid suffering but we can choose how to cope with it, find meaning in it, and move forward with renewed purpose. At the heart of his theory, known as logotherapy, is a conviction that the primary human drive is not pleasure but the pursuit of what we find meaningful. Learn more.
 
 

We're moving to a new events platform!

To register for this program, please visit: https://nvdpl.events.mylibrary.digital/series?si=&sn=books+to+talk+about

 

 
 
Location:
Wednesday, June 12, 2024 - 2:30pm

Do you love to talk about what you’re reading? Join a book club to share your thoughts and hear what others have to say about books that spark discussion, curiosity, and debate! Discover new “Books to Talk About” and join a community of booklovers at NVDPL. Simply read the book and join us at the meeting!

Register online for the time and location that’s most convenient for you to receive meeting instructions and information in advance of the discussion! Join us every month or just for the meetings you prefer. If you miss a meeting but still want to discuss the book, you can also join us at a different time or location. Click here to see all six Books to Talk About book clubs.

Copies of the next book will be available to pick-up from Lynn Valley Library on or after the date of the current meeting. All books are offered on a first-come, first-served basis. Copies are also available in other formats, such as print, ebook, audiobooks, and more. Ask staff to help you find a copy!
 
This group meets in the Program Room at Lynn Valley Library.
 
 
Registration is optional. Everyone is welcome to drop in to any of the discussions; register online to receive handouts, reminders, etc.
 
 

20232024 Schedule for the Lynn Valley Thursday Evening Book Club:


Laughing with the Trickster: On Sex, Death, and Accordions by Tomson Highway
October 12 at 7:00pm 
Celebrated author and playwright Tomson Highway brings his signature irreverence to an exploration of five themes central to the human condition: language, creation, sex and gender, humour, and death. A comparative analysis of Christian, classical, and Cree mythologies reveals their contributions to Western thought, life, and culture—and how North American Indigenous mythologies provide unique, timeless solutions to our modern problems. Collected essays from the 2022 Massey Lectures. Learn more.

True Biz by Sara Nović
November 9 at 7:00pm 
"True biz? The students at the River Valley School for the Deaf just want to hook up, pass their history final, and have doctors, politicians, and their parents stop telling them what to do with their bodies. This revelatory novel plunges readers into the halls of a residential school for the deaf, where they'll meet Charlie, a rebellious transfer student who's never met another deaf person before; Austin, the school's  golden boy, whose world is rocked when his baby sister is born hearing; and February, the headmistress, who is fighting to keep her school open and her marriage intact, but might not be able to do both. As a series of crises both personal and political threaten to unravel each of them, Charlie, Austin, and February find their lives inextricable from one another—and changed forever. Learn more.

Man’s Search for Meaning by Viktor Frankl
January 11 at 7:00pm 
Hungarian psychiatrist Viktor Frankl's 1959 memoir has riveted generations of readers with its descriptions of life in Nazi death camps and its lessons for spiritual survival. Based on his own experience and the stories of his patients, Frankl argues that we cannot avoid suffering but we can choose how to cope with it, find meaning in it, and move forward with renewed purpose. At the heart of his theory, known as logotherapy, is a conviction that the primary human drive is not pleasure but the pursuit of what we find meaningful. Learn more.
 
Miss Iceland by Auđur Ava Ólafsdóttir
February 8 at 7:00pm 
Iceland in the 1960s. Hekla is a budding female novelist who was born in the remote district of Dalir. After packing her few belongings, including James Joyces's Ulysses and a Remington typewriter, she heads for Reykjavik with a manuscript buried in her bags. There, she intends to become a writer. Sharing an apartment with her childhood and queer friend Jón John, Hekla comes to learn that she will have to stand alone in a small male-dominated community that would rather see her win a pageant than be a professional artist. As the two friends find themselves increasingly on the outside, their bond shapes and strengthens them artistically in the most moving of ways. Learn more.
 
Wired for Music by Adriana Barton
March 14 at 7:00pm 
In this captivating blend of science and memoir, a Canadian health journalist and former cellist explores music as a source of health, resilience, connection, and joy. Traveling from state-of-the-art science labs to a remote village in Zimbabwe, her investigation gets to the heart of music’s profound effects on the human body and brain. Blending science and story, Wired for Music shows how our species’ age-old connection to melody and rhythm is wired inside us. Learn more.

Small Things Like These by Claire Keegan 
April 11 at 7:00pm 
It is 1985 in a small Irish town. During the weeks leading up to Christmas, Bill Furlong, a coal merchant and family man faces into his busiest season. Early one morning, while delivering an order to the local convent, Bill makes a discovery which forces him to confront both his past and the complicit silences of a town controlled by the church. Small Things Like These is a deeply affecting story of hope, quiet heroism, and empathy from one of our most critically lauded and iconic writers. Learn more.

We Measure the Earth with Our Bodies by Tsering Yangzom Lama
May 9 at 7:00pm 
In the wake of China's invasion of Tibet throughout the 1950s, Lhamo and her younger sister, Tenkyi, arrive at a refugee camp in Nepal. They survived the dangerous journey across the Himalayas, but their parents did not. As Lhamo - haunted by the loss of her homeland and her mother, a village oracle - tries to rebuild a life amid a shattered community, hope arrives in the form of a young man named Samphel and his uncle, who brings with him the ancient statue of the Nameless Saint-a relic known to vanish and reappear in times of need. Decades later, the sisters are separated, and Tenkyi is living with Lhamo's daughter, Dolma, in Toronto. While Tenkyi works as a cleaner and struggles with traumatic memories, Dolma vies for a place as a scholar of Tibetan Studies. But when Dolma comes across the Nameless Saint in a collector's vault, she must decide what she is willing to do for her community, even if it means risking her dreams. Learn more.

The Heart is a Lonely Hunter by Carson McCullers
June 13 at 7:00pm 
Carson McCullers’ prodigious first novel was published in 1940 to instant acclaim when she was just twenty-three. Set in a small town in the middle of the deep South, it is the story of John Singer, a lonely deaf-mute, and a disparate group of people who are drawn towards his kind, sympathetic nature. The owner of the café where Singer eats every day, a young girl desperate to grow up, an angry drunkard, a frustrated black doctor: each pours their heart out to Singer, their silent confidant, and he in turn changes their disenchanted lives in ways they could never imagine. Learn more.

 

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Location:
Thursday, June 13, 2024 - 7:00pm