Special Events & Concerts

Special events and concerts at the Library.

“Psychology has a short history but a long past,” wrote historian E.G. Boring. Scientific psychology began less than two centuries ago; but curiosity about human nature arose with the dawn of our species. Join Dr. Leonard George on Thursday, Jan. 20 to learn more.

When we explore the “psychologies” of the old Near Eastern and Mediterranean realms in light of modern psychology, we find an enchantment with altering consciousness and manipulating the brain.
 
We will review ancient ways of controlling awareness via meditation, ritual and drugs. What did the Mysteries of Eleusis have to do with rotting grain? How did a goddess introduce the world to logic? What did Egyptian magicians do to become “immortal”? Why was Socrates paralyzed in trance for days at a time? What was Pythagoras doing down in that cave? All will be revealed.
 
Leonard George, PhD is a psychologist, writer, educator and broadcaster. After earning his doctorate at the University of Western Ontario, he worked for 19 years in a variety of clinical settings, specializing in the assessment and treatment of psychotic disorders, seizure disorders, acute and chronic pain, and traumas such as severe burns and animal maulings. He then worked in academia for 15 years as a member of the Department of Psychology and the Department of Music Therapy and served as the Chair of the School of Social Sciences at Capilano University. As the author of two books and dozens of chapters and articles on a range of topics, he is co-editing the forthcoming text Explorations in Music and Esotericism. Leonard has given lectures and seminars around the world, and online. Twelve years ago, he launched Capilano Universe.
 
This event is part of the Capilano Universe Lecture Series.
 
 
This meeting will be held on Zoom. What you’ll need to attend: a computer with microphone (or headphones) and webcam, or your smartphone/tablet.
 
Registration required. Register online or call 604-984-0286, ext. 8144. Zoom link will be sent to those registered in advance of the meeting date.
 
 
 
 
Location:
Thursday, January 20, 2022 - 7:00pm to 8:45pm

Our second Capilano Universe event is Feb. 10. Join CapU instructors Tahmina Shayan and Elaine Beltran-Selliti in the conversation about social location and the colonial legacies of the places we inhabit, attuning to its present and missing narratives.

Inherently situated in conversation with its location, public art invites dialogue about the histories and the places we live. This presentation is animated by a public on-line exhibit at the North Shore Museum and Archives depicting projects by CapU’s early childhood students shaped as an aesthetic-political inquiry with public art in the city of North Vancouver or abroad.
 
Elaine Beltran-Sellitti instructs Early Childhood Education at Capilano University. She holds a Master of Arts in Education is currently pursuing her PHD in Curriculum and Instruction at Simon Fraser University. Some of her research interests are the roles of the educator in co-constructed projects with young children, contemporary Indigenous storybooks and place attuned curriculum.
 
Tahmina Shayan is an instructor in the School of Childhood Studies at Capilano University. She has a Master of Science in art education and Master of Education in curriculum and instruction from Pennsylvania State University. Her work studies the ways in which local and global discourses shape and impact early childhood curriculum and teachers’ pedagogical practices and the implication of such practices on children’s learning. She is interested in children’s artistic practices, cultural studies, globalization, teacher education, curriculum and pedagogy.
 
This event is part of the Capilano Universe Lecture Series.
 
 
This meeting will be held on Zoom. What you’ll need to attend: a computer with microphone (or headphones) and webcam, or your smartphone/tablet.
 
Registration required. Register online or call 604-929-3727, ext. 8166. Zoom link will be sent to those registered in advance of the meeting date.
 
 
 
 
Location:
Thursday, February 10, 2022 - 7:00pm to 8:45pm

On April 7, join CapU Psychology instructor Lesley Schimanski and help unravel the mysteries of canine cognition and emotion with the goal of strengthening the human-canine connection.

Have you ever wondered what it is like to be a dog? Recent research demonstrates that our pawfect companions have more in common with us than we previously realized, but we cannot assume that dogs understand and experience the world the same way we do.
 
Do they love us like we love them? Can they understand when we talk to them? How do they communicate with us and each other? Do they expect us to be the leaders of their pack? What is it like to have super sniffing powers? We will explore these questions and more!
 
Lesley Schimanski, PhD is a Faculty member in Psychology at Capilano University. Her specialization is in behavioural neuroscience, in which she studies the brain mechanisms of learning and memory in animals and humans. She is passionate about translating the complexities of scientific research into easily understood and openly communicated information while critically evaluating its relevance. Lesley is also passionate about animal welfare. She volunteers in governance and policy roles at the BC SPCA and loves her rescue dogs!
 
This event is part of the Capilano Universe Lecture Series.
 
 
This meeting will be held on Zoom. What you’ll need to attend: a computer with microphone (or headphones) and webcam, or your smartphone/tablet.
 
Registration required. Register online or call 604-987-4471, ext. 8175. Zoom link will be sent to those registered in advance of the meeting date.
 
 
 
 

 

Location:
Thursday, April 7, 2022 - 7:00pm to 8:45pm